US charges one American, four Chinese officials with spying on dissidents, human rights leaders, pro-democracy activists

US prosecutors have charged four officials from China's Ministry of State Security with spying on US-based human rights activists, the US Justice Department said on Wednesday.
An indictment released Tuesday said the intelligence officers ran the campaign in conjunction with a US citizen, directing him to interact with human rights activists and dissidents, report on their testimonies and beliefs, and share their personal information.
The charges build on the case against US citizen Wang Shujun, who was arrested in March and accused of acting as an agent of China and making false statements to US authorities. While that earlier criminal complaint detailed the actions of Wang's handlers, they were not named or listed as the accused.
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Tuesday's indictment identified the four state security officers as Feng He, Jie Ji, Ming Li and Keqing Lu, all of whom are still at large. According to the indictment, Li and He worked at the Guangdong National Security Bureau, while Ji and Lu operated from Qingdao in Shandong Province.
Clockwise from top left: Feng He, Jie Ji, Keqing Lu and Ming Li were identified on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 as four Chinese state security officers alleged to have spied on Chinese dissidents, human rights activists and pro-democracy activists in the United States. Also named in the case but not pictured here is American citizen Wang Shujun. Photos: US Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York alt=Clockwise from top left: Feng He, Jie Ji, Keqing Lu and Ming Li were identified on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 as four Chinese state security officers allegedly spying on Chinese people Dissidents, human rights activists and pro-democracy activists in the USA are said to have. Also named in the case but not pictured here is American citizen Wang Shujun. Photos: US Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York>
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Wang is accused by prosecutors of operating "under the direction and control" of China's Ministry of State Security from 2005 to 2022, with his superiors via a messaging app, in face-to-face conversations during visits to China, and through "diaries" of his interactions with advocates of democracy.
These diary entries were sometimes saved as a draft email, allowing caregivers to access the email account and read the content without having to send any messages, the indictment said.
In a 2016 diary entry, Wang reportedly revealed the name of an individual who was planning demonstrations to protest Chinese President Xi Jinping's upcoming visit to the United States.
In a later diary entry, Wang reportedly detailed his conversations with an unnamed, prominent Hong Kong dissident at Li's request, including remarks on the activist's views on Hong Kong issues and personal information, including his home phone number.
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The dissident, described in the indictment as a "well-known lawyer" and a former member of Hong Kong's Legislative Council, was later arrested and charged over his role in organizing a protest in 2019.
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